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Kapp Putsch by Sian Hatcher

Posted on November 13, 2007 at 11:22 AM - Post Comment

  Kapp Putsch

 Kapp putsch took place in Weimar Germany in March 1920.

 Wolfgang Kapp was a right wing journalist who opposed all     that he believed Friedrich Ebert stood for after what he believed in the humiliation of the Treaty of Versailles.

 Kapp putsch was a huge threat to the Weimar’s government.

 Kapp was assisted by General Luttwitz who led a group of freikorps men. On March 13th 1920 Luttwitz seized Berlin and proclaimed that a new nationalist government was being made and that Wolfgang Kapp would be chancellor.    

  Ebert called for a general strike to paralyse the movement of those who supported Kapp and Luttwitz. Kapp received support from one of Germany’s foremost military officer’s general Erich Ludendorff.

The main officers did not follow Ludendorff lead. Ebert did not want to be seen as anti – military, the military did nothing to stop the putsch and give active support to Ebert. The general strike that Ebert made ensured that those who supported Kapp could not move around and such paralysis doomed the putsch to failure Kapp and Luttwitz fled to Berlin in March 17th. 

 The five days that the Kapp putsch was running showed importance because; the government had no force even with its own capital, only the mass power of the general strike could re – established Ebert’s authority, However, the success of this strike does indicate that the people of Berlin were willing to support Ebert’s government rather than a right-wing government lead by Kapp.

Those who fought for Kapp and Luttwitz were obvious future supporters of the fledgling Nazi Party. Ironically, the Erhardt Brigade, one of Luttwitz main fighting force, put a sign on their helmets to identify who they were: the swastika.


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